Online: Reading by Máiríde Woods and Theo Dorgan

Gráinne Enright, Fingal Poetry Festival, introducing Máiríde Woods and Theo Dorgan
Máiríde Woods
Theo Dorgan

Filmed in Sutton by Sean Leonard.

Máiríde Woods

Máiríde Woods writes poetry and short stories. Her work has appeared in anthologies and reviews, most recently, Poetry Ireland Review, and has also been broadcast on RTE radio.  She has won several prizes, including two Hennessys, the Francis McManus, and the PJ O’Connor awards from RTE.

Three poetry collections, ‘The Lost Roundness of the World’  ‘Unobserved Moments of Change’ and ‘A Constant Elsewhere of the Mind’ have been published by Astrolabe, the last in 2017. 

Máiríde was brought up in County Antrim but has lived most of her life in North Dublin.

Theo Dorgan

Theo Dorgan

Theo Dorgan’s most recent collections are: Bailéid Giofógacha – a translation into Irish of Lorca’s Romancero Gitano (Gypsy Ballads) (Coiscéim, 2019); Orpheus (2018); Nine Bright Shiners (2014) and Greek  (2010)  (Dedalus Press). His prose account of a transatlantic crossing under sail, Sailing For Home, was published by Penguin Ireland in 2004 and reissued by Dedalus in 2010.

A further prose book, Time On The Ocean: A Voyage from Cape Horn to Cape Town, was published by New Island in 2010. He has edited The Great Book of Ireland(with Gene Lambert, 1991); Revising the Rising (with Máirín Ní Dhonnachadha, 1991); Irish Poetry Since Kavanagh (Dublin, Four Courts Press, 1996); Watching the River Flow (with Noel Duffy, Dublin, Poetry Ireland/Éigse Éireann, 1999); The Great Book of Gaelic (with Malcolm Maclean, Edinburgh, Canongate, 2002); and The Book of Uncommon Prayer (Dublin, Penguin Ireland, 2007).

A former Director of Poetry Ireland/Éigse Éireann, Theo Dorgan has worked extensively as a broadcaster of literary programmes on both radio and television. His awards include the Listowel Prize for Poetry, 1992, and The O’Shaughnessy Prize For Irish Poetry 2010. A member of Aosdána, he served on The Arts Council / An Chomhairle Ealaíon 2003–2008.

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